11

In Android we have a way to view running tasks and RAM usage. Does Windows Phone have something similar? I think it is must for a smartphone.

9

The closest you have is in the Battery Saver app for monitoring power consumption (albeit only when not connected to external power) - the reason there is nothing more complex is that apps is that there is only ever one app running in the foreground - the others in the task switcher are suspended, and not consuming any valuable resources (they remain in memory, but the operating system will kick them out if memory pressure means the space is needed).

Apps can have background tasks which will show in battery saver, on the usage page as either "allowed" or "not allowed" - if neither shows, that app doesn't have any background tasks; you can also tap on an app to disable its background task, if you'd like - this may disable background tasks like updating your lock screen or weather forecasts on a live tile, for instance.

  • But the tasks that have been suspended won't they become unstable – Arjuna Jan 13 '15 at 13:51
  • 1
    I've never seen an app from the store not recover from being suspended - app developers are used to this, and would explicitly test this to pass store certification. – Rowland Shaw Jan 13 '15 at 14:16
  • @RowlandShaw Actually a lot of apps recover as a new state. For example Facebook. If I switch to it right now it will resuming... until it loads the lists from the top again and lot where a left. It's more like developers need to remember where the app was left and try to go there again. But in many cases online data is got again. – Vitor Canova Jan 15 '15 at 11:36
  • 1
    @VitorCanova I'd consider that behaviour as desired, for that app - whether or not you agree with how they've chosen to recover, the app does recover, and doesn't crash after being suspended... – Rowland Shaw Jan 15 '15 at 12:15
7

Actually there isn't, and theres also no need for one as on Windows Phone there can only be one app actively running in the foreground. The OS frees up memory from suspended apps when needed. You can also manually close those apps through the task switcher by holding the back button.

There are Background Tasks which you can manage through the Battery Saver app, but those only run periodically at times and with memory limits that wont disturb the app currently running in foreground.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/apps/jj681682(v=vs.105).aspx

1

Hi Yes you can hold the back button, the list of the recent applications appears and next to each one a close button is available. Close the application with the close button and that's it.

  • 2
    I think that these are recent applications, rather than open ones. And they're all in a suspended state until re-activated. – Richard Everett Dec 3 '15 at 15:51

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.